Against Zoom

Just over a year ago the word ”Zoom” referred to a camera lens. But now Zoom has a different meaning altogether and refers to the popular video-conferencing app. It was novel at first but now it’s beginning to pall as a way of worship and a mode of meeting. I dislike looking at myself as if into a mirror when speaking. I also miss the sense of full body context so that you can become aware of the boredom or irritation of others. Gestures and body language are easily missed –formal disagreement with a speaker is difficult. I have also discovered that you can do other things while zooming such as reading texts and following up links and the rest of the meeting is oblivious to your activities.

I have set a personal limit on the number of Zoom meetings I can cope with per day without endangering my psychiatric well-being and emotional stability. That number is three. A webinar counts as half a zoom. I look forward to Zoom free holidays.

How do you feel about worship on Zoom? How do I feel? On a daily basis I attend Morning Prayer by Zoom with Anglican colleagues and friends. There is a set order which is screen shared, the two readings and psalms change every day and the intercessions are offered on a free and extemporary basis. There are three daily tasks: leader which includes the extemporary prayers, reader and responder. There are five regular members of the group although sometimes a sixth person joins us. It works very well and has now been going five days a week for a year.

Other forms of Zoom worship can also be a positive experience provided there is an opportunity for everyone present to be seen and to make a real contribution. What I personally dislike is the splicing together of various elements: prayers, readings, sermon and song for transmission to a passive congregation of viewers at a later date. I find this to be an utterly sterile experience perhaps especially when I myself have preached the sermon.

The Christian faith is faith in God who has become incarnate in the man Jesus. The word has become flesh and dwells among us. (John 1 v14) Bodily presence matters. We acknowledge the presence of the risen Christ among us in one another and in the bread and wine by which that presence is particularly signified. The word has become flesh not a video conferencing app.

It is all very well to read spiritual books, think lofty and enlightened thoughts and cultivate an enhanced condition of soulful life but the presence of Jesus, our incarnate God, is about his presence in one another and especially in those who particularly need our help. The others really matter. Now I am not denying the value of periods of solitude and silence. Methodism would benefit from a lot more silence. As T S Eliot wrote: “Even the anchorite who meditates alone prays for the Church, the body of Christ incarnate”. We have been deprived for a long time-a year without the Lord’s Supper!  Who would have believed it possible!

St Paul in 1 Corinthians speaks of Christian worship as the time when we come together.

“When you come together each one has a hymn, a lesson, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation. Let all things be done for edification.”

Sound good to me. Let it come soon!!

1 thought on “Against Zoom

  1. Liz Topliss

    Thank you Peter for your thoughts. I agree with them (mostly!) While I have been grateful for ‘Zoom’ worship I hope it doesn’t ‘take over’. I thanked God for technology (never thought I would say that!) because I believe it does have a place and we can use it as another tool in providing worship for those unable to meet face to face, those who are disabled, housebound, live miles away, or are providing essential services like people on duty in hospitals etc. When we are allowed to visit we can take our laptops, ipads etc with us to share in worship with those who otherwise might be denied the opportunity to worship because of their circumstances. My mother who had been to church every week of her life, until confined to a Care Home, was grateful to her pastoral visitor who went every week so that they could share worship together. This was one of the motivating factors in my starting ‘Songs of Praise’ at a local Care Home 12 years ago. I look forward to being able to take the lap top with me so that Colin and I can share worship together in due course.

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